Scientists discover hydrogen producing bacteria

Scientists discover hydrogen producing bacteria

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Dr. Melanie Mormile, Prof. of Biological sciences at Missouri University of Science and Technology. (Credit: Missouri University of Science and Technology)
Dr. Melanie Mormile, Professor of Biological sciences at Missouri University of Science and Technology, et al., stumbled upon the bacterium Halanaerobium hydrogeninformans, which could help in mass production of hydrogen for fuel cells in the future. They discovered the bacterium in Soap Lake, Washington. Their research study was published in the journal Frontiers in Microbiology. The bacterium can produce hydrogen under saline and alkaline conditions, better than modified organisms and could be valuable industrially when the process is scaled up. Another end product of the hydrogen process is an organic compound, 1, 3-propenediol that finds application in products including composites, adhesives, laminates and coatings. It’s also a solvent and can be used as antifreeze. The researcher came upon the microbe when looking for extremophiles or organisms that can survive under extreme and hostile conditions.